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find that hamas has now -- has hosted leaders from turkey, from egypt, qatar, foreign ministers from a variety of arab countries. it gained quite a lot in the last eight days, and some people here would say it would be foolhardy for them to lose their gains, simply because some small faction decides to launch a rocket over the border. >> and you're looking at a live picture on the right-hand side of your screen of gaza city. keep that picture up as we continue our discussion to see if there are any more incoming shells from israeli defense forces nerks o forces, any outgoing forces. joined by wolf blitzer here in our studio, in jerusalem. you just spoke to mark reghev, the spokesman for the prime minister. you asked him some key questions and for some there were not answers. in particular what happens to the borders, to the blockade of gaza city? >> i think that will depend if this thing holds. if the rockets no longer go into israel, if there is no firing at israeli troops who are patrolling the border, if that stops, i think the israelis are prepared to take some steps to ease some
on the end of the hostilities there in just a few minutes. >>> and let's move to egypt now where protesters had gathered in cairo's tahrir square calling for the ouster of president mohamed morsy. opposition leaders say new powers grabbed by morsy make him look like a dictator. reza sayah has more on the massive protests. >> reporter: outrage, clashes and anguish in tahrir. thousands of angry egyptians back in a public square that has become the arab world's emblem for the democratic right to protest. this was where egyptians demanded the ouster of former president hosni mubarak last year. this time the fury aimed at current president mohamed morsy. >> we're here because we don't want morsy to rule us anymore. >> a one-man show. he wants to do everything. nothing at all of what we want, you know? >> reporter: on thursday, the new president made himself the most powerful man in egypt by announcing sweeping decrees he says will designed to push forward the drafting of egypt's new constitution and speed up the formation of a government that's still missing a parliament. >> one of his decrees b
headquarters in atlanta, this is early start weekend. egypt on edge. thousands of furious protesters packed tahrir square after their new president makes a bold move for unprecedented power. >> dramatic new video this morning. look at this. a gas explosion shreds a strip club. >> and you drove cliff to attempt suicide? >> how was i to know he was going to do a dumb thing like that? >> and tv's original bad boy, hollywood reacting to the death of "dallas" star larry hagman. it is saturday, november 24th. i'm randi kaye. >> i'm victor blackwell. thank you for starting your morning with us. >> we begin in tahrir square this morning where hundreds of protesters have been arrested during anti-government dmem k. demonstrations angry with their president over his new power grab. >> opposition leaders say he is now more powerful than former president hosni mubarak ever was. this week, leaders around the world praised him for brokering a cease fire between israel and hamas. . >> more now on his new powers and the anger it spurred. >> if anyone thought egyptians were tired or weary of protesting afte
-fire. netanyahu said israel is prepared to take whatever action is necessary to defend itself. and egypt, which is brokering a deal between the two sides, cancelled a press conference where officials were expected to announce a deal with terms for a cease-fire. tomorrow, secretary clinton meets with the palestinian president, mahmoud abbas and then will fly to egypt to speak with president mohamed morsi. that is going to be a very interesting conversation, because, of course, as so many of you are aware, morsi is in a tough situation. many of the people in egypt, obviously, don't support working with israel at all. and within the past hour, there were several explosions in gaza city. let's get straight to our team there. >> obviously, looks like we're having a problem with that shot. we'll be getting there in just a moment. difficult to communicate with them, because of these rockets that have been going off. let's try again. let's go back there to ben. >> here in gaza. there were a few hours of relative quiet. but as we have seen within really the last 15 minutes, an intense attack on a buildi
president played a role here. how significant is it that egypt is playing the shots? >> when it came to trying to mediate the deals, egypt has played a critical role what has changed is the dynamics, the ally of the west and the de facto ally of israel is no longer in power and the egyptians became an entity and that changed a lot of the dynamics and that has changed the way it has been playing out here on the ground. the frame work of what is transpiring here, that is what has changed at this point. most certainly, given the fact that it is a young government, it has in one sense past that first critical test. thank you very much indeed. >> welcome to you. >> thank you for having me. >> can you you outline what you believe the spirit of this agreement to be today? it is an arrangement that has been with the support of the united states and it promises us the people of southern israel peace and quiet. that they no longer have to fear rockets coming in. the promise of the possibility to live a normal life. >> i understand that it promises the people of gaza a better future we are hear
. and everybody in gaza will be committed because egypt is brokering this. the egyptians can do that. and they're the only ones who can do that, actually. >> what is your assessment of the u.s. role in all of this? do you believe the president, president obama, is doing enough to try to achieve a cease-fire? >> i'm sure he is. i'm sure he's engaged with the egyptians and the turks, with the europeans, engaged with us. but the key here is -- i think the egyptians -- i spoke to some of their officials this afternoon, they are exerting every possible effort there is in order to reach a comprehensive cease-fire. i think they can achieve it. provide the guarantees for all sides. >> is the palestinian authority -- what i'm hearing, i think the answer is yes. but you tell me. is the palestinian authority -- you're associated with the president, mahmoud abbas, on the same page right now with hamas in gaza? >> look, today, we are not the authority. we are all palestinians, wolf. it is our people. we know we want to reach peace. that's our ticket to security and peace. unfortunately, we have been unable
. [ gunfire ] secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister announced the deal in cairo after the secretary spent the day in intense face-to-face talks with the leaders of israel, the palestinian authority and egypt. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt's new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership it has long made this country a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> we're still learning details of the agreement between the israelis and hamas. egypt and the united states apparently have assumed important major roles in keeping the peace and preventing new supplies of rockets from being smuggled into gaza. president obama spoke by phone today with the leaders of both egypt and israel. >> translator: i have agreed with the president that israel and the united states would work together to prevent the smuggling of arms to the terror organizations. the vast majority of which comes from iran. >> throughout this crisis cnn has positioned crews throughout the region including correspondents in egypt and on both sides of the israeli/gaza
'll also visit egypt and the west bank city of ramallah. and while the two sides are trading cease-fire proposals, israel's ambassador tells erin burnett his country is ready to launch a full-scale ground invasion. we talk to our reporter in phnom penh. she's been following the secretary of state. she departed just a few minutes ing aheaded to the middle east. good morning, jessica. what can you tell us about the secretary of state's mission? >> reporter: hi, john. good morning. the secretary of state is headed now to israel, ramallah and egypt to see if she can work with those three partners to try -- well, not partners -- but those three interests to see if she can help fashion some sort of a cease-fire. her trip was announced here in cambodia by a white house official, ben rhodes, with the national security council. and he made it very clear that in the white house's view, the primary onus is on hamas to take the first step in starting this truce by stopping their rocket fire into israel. listen to what he had to say. >> the bottom line still remains that hamas has to stop this
and egypt and we are told secretary of state clinton has been working the phones trying to muster international pressure to diffuse the situation rockets have been flying both ways. israel is aiming at terrorist targets and that's what it looks and sounds like from a distance. here it is up close during an israeli and palestinian who are in the thick of it. >> let me jump in there, mohammed. when you hear him describe the situation where he is, what goes through your mind? >> sorry. that is one thing. carry on with your question. [ indiscernible ] >> the palestinian health minister says at least 30 people have been killed in gaza, 300 wounded. many of them children and women. he says we can't independently verify those numbers. cnn's sarah sidener is reporting for us in dangerous conditions. >> we have to leave this area now because there are air strikes, and we can hear the planes and we've also seen rockets coming from a neighborhood just from the other side. >> today egypt's prime minister is in the dark jacket visited a hospital in gaza city to see the damage first hand. how e
and the palestinian leadership on the west bank, and in egypt, i think that could result in something. we'll see if she can help break this logjam. they were close but they're not there until they're there. >> she used an interesting phrase. she described the situation as requiring deescalation rather than cease-fire. what did she mean by that? >> right. i think they're talking about having some sort of period of what the palestinians call calm or what the israelis want to test to see what the hamas militants in gaza are up to. they're not ready to call it a formal cease-fire and remember, the u.s., israel, the europeans, for that matter, they don't recognize hamas. they regard hamas as a terrorist organization so it's awkward. they can't deal directly with one of the principal players in this part of the world, hamas, which controls gaza. it's up to countries like egypt or turkey or qatar to broker that kind of a deal because they have good relations with hamas. so it's an awkward situation and there's no trust, totally no trust from hamas towards the israelis and certainly no trust from the is
, president obama, has called and talked to the president of egypt, morsi, three times now in the last 24 hours. really trying to put a u.s. stamp, footprint, if you will, on the negotiations. how much leverage does the u.s. have in actually making sure that the cease-fire is something that's going to hold? >> well the u.s. doesn't have much leverage over hamas because the u.s. doesn't deal with hamas. the u.s. government, previous governments, regards hamas as a terrorist organization. when secretary of state hillary clinton visits here in jerusalem later, then goes to ramallah to meet with mahmoud abbas tomorrow and then goes to cairo she's not going to meet with anyone from hamas. the u.s. does have leverage on egypt, given the economic and military assistance the u.s. provides to egypt and given the dire economic straits that the egyptians are in right now. so the u.s. has leverage on the egyptians and obviously the u.s. has very good relations with israel. so the u.s. is a key player in all of this. but as far as leverage on hamas, u.s. leverage is limited. >> secretary of state hill
're getting these rockets through the tunnels in the southern border with egypt. some of them is more than one stage. it's a long rocket. it has to be disassembled and brought in. and this has increased the range of the rockets fired by hamas and the other resistance organizations as far as jerusalem and tel aviv. and that has real significant change. really the most significant change we've seen in the conflict between hamas and israel for quite some time. >> reporter: you and i were also on the scene about four or five blocks from here earlier in the day when three israeli missiles hit the second floor of the media center. explain what happened there earlier. >> reporter: that was about 3:20 in the afternoon, and we saw three rockets hit the building. one hit the front. we saw a great big ball of flame coming out. very quickly, a large crowd of journalists, of course, and first responders, the fire department, the ambulances showed up. they did bring out a man on a stretcher. his body was completely charred. he appeared lifeless. >> reporter: his clothes had been burned off. >> reporter: com
morsi playing a pivotal role here. how is egypt calling the shots in terms of the way the palestinians are reacting? >> reporter: well, on the one hand, one needs to remember when it comes to mediating the deals between the two sides israel has always played a critical and central role. what has changed now is the dynamics between egypt and israel after the arab spring, and after the fact that hosni mubarak, who was a staunch ally of the east, is no longer in power. and now the egyptians became an entity because of the fact they are led by the muslim brotherhood, became an entity here in gaza. and that changed the dynamics and it has changed the way we have been seeing things the way they played out on the ground. the dynamics of what is transpiring that led to the cease-fire, we'll have to wait and see if it holds. that is what has changed, most certainly, egypt, given the fact it is a very young government, has at least for now proven itself. in one sense it has passed that critical test. >> arwa damon, thank you very much. welcome to you. >> thanks for having me. >> can you outline
on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking on fighters that are smuggling weapons in, and they see israel as an illegal occupying force for more than 40 years. they see this as an unjust, as a lopsided conflict, and they want president morsi to do something about it. at the same time mr. morsi has made it clear that he doesn't want to disrupt his alliances with was
in egypt after negotiations break down between president morsi and judicial officials and people are are taking to the streets. >>> lawmakers back to work in the u.s. priority number one, avoiding the fiscal cliff. the left and right are talking compromi compromise. and the u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, headed to c p capitol hill to meet with her most outspoken critics, answer questions about what happened in benghazi. benghazi. let's go "outfront." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> good evening. "outfront" tonight, egypt on edge. is a new dictatorship on the horizon? tonight, president morsi clarified, but really largely stood by his decision to grant himself sweeping powers. including freedom from judicial review for what he's calling presidential decisions. the announcement was made today after morsi met with members of egypt's judicial body, which has been very critical of his position and u.s. officials who were praising the new leader for his role in negotiating a cease fire between israel and hamas, well now when he took all these powers away from judge
't happen before, is that egypt the leading player in getting this cease fire is a guarantour of the cease fire. but israel and officials there told me that they didn't want to go into another cease fire. they wanted real partners and if there is a problem and if they think somebody has been violating it, they can go and talk to the guarantor. but that is a change as well. >> thank you. >> well, prime minister neta t netanaour, warned of issues, and joining me now is michael oren, michael, we have heard from a lot of israelis tonight, who are very concerned and doubtful of ham hamas's ability long-term to live up to the agreement and make progress on these agreements. how can you guarantee that hamas will not use this and other groups as an opportunity to rearm and restock their supplies of the oh sophisticated weapons that we have seen them having? >> well, it is first of all good to be back with you as alwayses. some are skeptical about the cease fire. they have been liveing with thi since 2005. they have seen those cease fires being violated again and again by hamas. prime minister to
of egypt, which have acted as a mediator, say a cease-fire is imminent but that's not been confirmed by israel. as we speak the secretary of state, hillary clinton, is on her way here to jerusalem for a late-night meeting with the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu. she's due to meet tomorrow with the leader of the palestinian authority in the west bank, president mahmood abbas and then she will fly to cairo to meet with mohamed morsi. she won't meet with hamas which the u.s. government regards as a terrorist organization. netanyahu met last hour with secretary of state ban ki-moon. the two met with reporters only moments ago. >> unfortunately, mr. secretary, hamas and islamic jihad and the other terrorist groups do not share your concern about our civilian casualties or about civilian casualties at all. >> that was the israeli prime minister meeting with the u.s. secretary-general ban ki-moon. earlier today israel put an all-out ground assault of gaza on hold,age i'm quoting, to give limited time for a diplomatic solution. egypt sees an end to the gaza conflict, that's see. p
on it, the interesting thing which didn't happen before is that egypt, the leading player in getting this cease-fire is a guarantor of the cease-fire, that was something that israel wanted and hamas wanted as well. but israeli officials told me in jerusalem, they didn't want to go into another nebulous cease-fire, they wanted real partners as they said to guarantee it, and if there is a problem and somebody has been violating it, they can go and talk to the guarantor, so that is a bit of a change as well. >>> christianne amanpour, thank you. >>> u.n. secretary-general ban ki-moon says long-term solutions are necessary to address the underlying causes of conflict. joining me now is michael orin, the ambassador to the united states from israel. we heard about residents along the gaza border who are doubtful about the ability long term to maintain the cease-fire and live up to the agreements and make progress on agreements. how can you guarantee that hamas will not use this and other groups like islamic jihad as an opportunity to rearm, to restock supplies of sophisticated weapons we ha
. and the interesting thing again here which didn't happen before is that egypt, the leading player in getting this cease-fire, is a guarantor of the cease-fire, that is something that israel wanted, and egypt. israel told me in jerusalem they don't want to go into a nebulous cease-fire, they think if there is a problem, they can go and talk to the guarantor. so that, i think, is a bit of a change, as well. >> all right, christiane amanpour, appreciate talking to you tonight, thank you. >>> and netanyahu warning there could be additional problems if that doesn't lead to security. u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon says there are other issues necessary to address the conflict now. michael, we have heard from a lot of israelis tonight, particularly in the border regions along the gaza border who are very concerned and very doubtful about hamas's ability, long-term to maintain the cease-fire. to live up to the agreements and make progress on these agreements. how can you guarantee that hamas will simply not use this and other groups, like islamist jihad, to re-arm, to re-stock their supplies of s
positioned along the border with gaza. a visit to gaza by egypt's prime minister failed to stop the bombardment and pull the region from the brink of all-out war. u.s. officials blame hamas for starting this conflict. but they are also urging to be measured in its response. the defense secretary leon panetta says israel and the palestinians need to negotiate a more permanent piece -- his words, a more permanent piece in the region. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr's been watching what's going on. barbara, what is the u.s. military most concerned about right now? >> wolf, as they watch that call-up of 75,000 israeli reservists, that is the concern. is this leading to a ground war? we've talked to officials here who say the major concern israel will move in on the ground. and that will be a significant escalation that will reverberate throughout the region. so here's the calculation. how far will hamas go in continuing its rocketed mortar attacks into israel? they know that if they pull back, the israelis presumably will pullback and this dangerous escalation can be avoide
with egypt and with israel. they want an end to targeted assassinations, an end to israeli military operations within gaza. whether these -- and i spoke with one official from hamas today who told me that, you know, there are contacts with egypt, they are passing messages back and forth, but at this point he says he sees no imminent cease-fire popping up anytime soon. obviously the palestinians, hamas, and fatah as well will pay proper deference to ban ki-moon and any other official who wants to discuss this situation here, but really fundamentally the problem is between gaza and israel, and all those who come and try to help, if they're just coming to visit, express sympathy as some are doing, that's not going to change the situation on the ground. >> as you just said, 800 wounded. how are the civilians overall holding up there? >> reporter: well, to a certain extent they're accustomed to this. gaza in one form or another has been a place where there's been fighting, clashes, protests, occupation going back decades. so people are accustomed to life taking some very unexpected and v
troops are poised at the border, ready to move at gaza. negotiations speer headed by egypt are ongoing, and tonight the united nations secretary-general ban ki-moon arrived in cairo, just hours after egypt's intelligence chief gave an israeli delegation a letter from hamas outlining its conditions for a cease-fire. so far on the israeli side, officials say throw people have died. 68 have been wounded as the result of rocket fire from gaza and in gaza, officials say 104 people have been killed. 860 have been wounded since the conflict began. as for fire power, israel says militants in gaza have fired nearly 1,000 rockets at israel. 570 of them have actually struck israel. another 307 have been intercepted by israel's so-called iron dome defense system. meanwhile, israel carried out 80 strikes today. it has now targeted 1,300 sites in gaza since it began its bombing campaign last wednesday. ben wedeman is in gaza city tonight. ben, how are civilians dealing with this conflict? some of those numbers we hear, 870 people injured are frightening. >> yeah, they're not dealing very well with i
now. egypt is the main broker. egypt is also in contact with the united states. also, there is turkey's involvement, qatar's involvement, the head of the hamas political wing is also involved. in temz of creating with israel, egypt is the main broker. we understand it has not been confirmed for us that an israeli envoy is at the table or at least has been and is involved in these talks, but the impression we're getting from the israeli side is that they're obviously involved in the negotiations and each side is looking very closely at what the other is proposing. has each side sent enough of a message that they can say, okay, this is it. we've sent our message. we want this and that, and now is the time to get off the military ramp? we'll see. >> you've covered this. when you take a look at this situation on the ground and you realize the israeli government is calling up 75,000 reservists, massing tens of thousands of troops and tanks near the border at the palestinian territory, what does this say to you in terms of a ground invasion? does it seem inevitable? what do you make of what
prime minister benjamin netanyahu before jetting to cairo for talks with the president of egypt, mohammad morsi. the urgency underscored by the carnage in benghazi. rockets are lobbying back and forth. israeli air attacks killing 27 more palestinians bringing the death toll to 137 just in the last week. >> now a spokesman for hamas sounded cautiously optimistic that a cease-fire could be at hand telling cnn we are close, we are on the edge. cnn has reporters blanketing the region to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of this crisis in gaza. fred pleitgen is in ashkelon, ben wedemans in gaza city. ben wedeman, good morning, set the scene for me. >> reporter: yes, brooke, it was a noisezy night and we saw intense bombardment just behind where i'm standing. that was proceeded by increasing sort of mounting reports that a cease-fire was about to be announced or a period of calm. but it appears that there were problems within the israeli government that prime minister benjamin netanyahu and his foreign minister lieberman didn't see eye to eye with the defense minister who was
by egypt, turkey and qatari officials. israeli defense forces targeted a media building in gaza, aiming at four senior hamas operatives they believed were inside. and two people died. it is not clear if they were the ones designated as the hamas targets. hamas, which grew out of the muslim brotherhood, seized in our gaza in 2007. since then, the group has become increasingly militarized. the death toll stands at 100 in gaza including women and children. and three in israel. any others have been wounded on both sides. israel credits its anti-missional defense system known as the iron dome funded by the united states for its low number of deaths. cnn's frederick platkin was live when the system intercepted a rocket midair. >> there, over in the sky, you probably won't be able to see it here, there is an interceptor missile taking off now. that's the iron dome interceptor. if you saw the flash in the sky, that was a rocket coming out of gaudia that was just intercepted right now. >> despite back and forth rocket and missile launches, there is a behind the scenes optimism that a cease-fire
egypt's president, trying to broker a truce. minutes ago he declared that israel will soon halt its air strikes on gaza. along egypt's border with gaza, reza sayeh. tell us more. >> reporter: we don't want to jump to conclusions. we should be very cautious. there are growing signs from where we are standing in egypt that there could a closing in on a truce or cease fire. latest sign is a statement made by egyptian president mohamed morsi, according to state tv. he said that, quote, israeli gra aggression would end on tuesday. that, of course, is today. that's consistent with similar statements we've heard from other officials late last night. we spoke with a senior egyptian official and he told us he's optimistic that in the next 24 hours there would be a cease fire. hamas officials are being even more specific. senior hamas official telling cnn that israel has agreed to the general terms but rejected the timing. hamas conditions, according to an official, are this. stop the air operation, air assaults and want the ground crossings, blockades to be opened up immediately. according to th
to hear, egypt's president mohamed morsi suggesting progress in attempts at brokering a cease-fire. and backing hamas, released a statement saying, the travesty of the israel aggression on gaza will end in a few hours. we're going to get to the details of all of this and the apparent pause in fighting in just a moment. but first, we want to look at the united states role and all the various players that are involved in this. and in about an hour, secretary of state hillary clinton is to meet with israel prime minister benjamin netanyahu. tomorrow, she is scheduled to meet with the palestinian authority. mahmoud abbas. he's in the west bank. that's on the opposite side of israel from gaza. he's going to be talking -- talking to the palestinian authority, it is a way really to communicate with hamas. now, clinton cannot speak with hamas directly because the united states considers it a terrorist group. so by talking to palestinians she can reach hamas. talking to egypt's president is going to be her last stop. as we see here. so by talking to egypt, that's another way for her to
in the past two days. three died yesterday from rocket fire. egypt dispatched its prime minister to gaza to show support for the palestinian people and hamas today. he met with hamas's prime minister about the casualties on the ground. he visited a hospital, showed emotion over the death of a 1-year-old boy. he also read a verse from the koran and later egypt's president mohammed morsi gave a fiery speech in support of the palestinian people on state tv. listen. >> we support the people of gaza. what hurts them, hurts us. >> hate and violence between the israelis and palestinians was sparked by this. israel's assassination of hamas's military chief on wednesday. an assassination that israel called necessary because of increased rocket attacks from gaza into israel the last several weeks. our senior international correspondent ben wiederman has been covering the middle east. you've been covering it for decades now. when you see israel moving hundreds of troops to the border of israel and gaza and saying it's going to call up 16,000 more reservists, what does that sound like they're prepar
room" starts now. >>> happening now, police fire tear gas as demonstrations in egypt turn violent. angry protesters accuse egypt's president of betraying the revolution. and in the word of one critic, making himself a pharoah. what happened before and after u.s. navy s.e.a.l.s. did in the moments before killing osama bin laden. >>> wolf blitzer's off today. i'm joe johns. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with today's astonishing show of fury in egypt. within the past hour egyptian authorities tear gassed protesters in cairo's tahrir square. angry demonstrators packed the square today denouncing egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look
after his body was kissed by egypt's prime minister during a tour of a gaza hospital. we need to warn you about the video you're about to see. it's heartbreaking and may be considered disturbing to many of our viewers. for our report, cnn visited the child's home that neighbors said had been bombed five hours previously. neighbors and family members told cnn they heard an aircraft before the explosion. the israeli military told cnn today it did not carry out any air strikes at the time of the child's death. the israeli defense force says it stopped attacks because of the visit of egypt's prime minister, raising questions about what cause the fatal blast. among the other possibilities, the misfire of an hamas rocket intended for israel. cnn's crew in gaza said it saw two rockets passing overhead, apparently fired not far from where the boy lived. >>> since the air strikes began wednesday, at least 65 palestinians and 3 israelis have been killed and neither side is showing any signs of backing down. cnn's senior international correspondent sarah sidner is in gaza city right now. sara, w
" tonight, egypt on edge. is a new dictatorship on the horizon? tonight, president morsi clarified, but really largely stood by his decision to grant himself sweeping powers. including freedom from judicial review for what he's calling presidential decisions. the announcement was made today after morsi met with members of egypt's judicial body, which has been very critical of his decision. and u.s. officials who just days ago were heaping praise on the new egyptian leader for his role in initiating a cease-fire between israel and hamas, well, now when he took all these powers away from judges that reign supreme, they're in a tough spot. >> we have some concerns about the decisions and declarations announced on november 22nd. democracy depends on strong institutions and the important checks and balances that provide accountability. >> so, today, there were nationwide protests continuing in egypt and a million person march of anti morsi protesters is scheduled for tomorrow in tahrir square. the very spot where the revolution that cleared the way for morsi's presidency was born. now,
by the united states and instead they find egypt, turkey, other countries of the region, are playing a much more proactive role in the crisis. >> hillary clinton will be meeting with mahmoud abbas, with the palestinian authority, with fatah in the west bank. a lot of observers say that's a face-saving move to help him out. sort of been sidelined in all of this, who comes out in the group stronger? does hamas emerge stronger no matter what happens? what does that mean moving forward for u.s. relations with pat stillian groups? the u.s. doesn't recognize hamas. been trying to deal with the palestinian authority. but if they have lost power, what does that mean moving forward to getting a longer term peace deal? >> to be honest, i don't think either palestinian faction comes out ahead the palestinian people have known six decades of futility. never been able to formulate what they need to do with their own lives. never have diplomatic answers. so i think now the hamas people will have their moment in the sun. there will be people that will come to them. visitors from afar. the turks will come in, a
. and the interesting thing again here, which didn't happen before, is that egypt, the leading player in getting this cease-fire, is a guarantor of the cease-fire. that was something that israel wanted and hamas wanted as well. but israel and israeli officials told me in jerusalem they didn't want to go into another nebulas cease-fire. that, i think, is a bit of a change as well. >> christiane amanpour, appreciate talking to you tonight. thank you. >>> prime minister netanyahu warned there could be additional military action if the cease-fire does not lead to long-term security. u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon says a broader cease-fire, long-term solutions are necessary to address the underlying causes of conflict. joining me now live is michael orr, israeli ambassador to the united states. we've heard from a lot of israelis tonight, particularly in the border regions along the gaza border who are very concerned and very doubtful about hamas's ability long term to maintain the cease-fire, to live up to the agreement and to make progress on these agreements. how can you guarantee that hamas wi
. in egypt, we've seen huge protests against president mohamed morsi and the new powers he assumed just a day after the truce. he's insisting he's committed to democracy, but opponents are calling him a dictator it could be a complication for the cease-fire between israel and hamas negotiations moving forward. let's go to cnn's reza sayah in cairo. >> reporter: joe, the coming weeks here in egypt are going to be fascinating when it comes to politics. that's because there is an intensifying faceoff between egyptian president mohamed morsi and his opponents. outrage aimed at mr. morsi after the announcement of a number of controversial decrees earlier this week that give him sweeping powers. they make him at least temporarily the most powerful man in egypt. also seems to be an effort to push through the all-important drafting of the new constitution and putting in place the formation of egypt's new parliament want. one of the decrees bans anyone, even the judiciary, from appealing, overturning, questioning any decision mr. morsi has made since taking office in june. that order is to be set in p
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